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National Teen Driver Safety Week quickly approaches

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has designated the week of October 15-21, 2017 as National Teen Driver Safety Week.

This is a time where parents or those of us with influence over a teen driver should find ways to communicate with teen drivers about traffic safety.  The communication should be about safe driving rules and keeping our teens safe while driving.  Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death to a teen ages 15 to 18 ahead of other types of injury, disease and violence. 

The greatest driving risks to this age group are:

  • alcohol
  • inconsistent or no seat belt use
  • distracted and drowsy driving
  • speeding
  • number of passengers

There were 1,972 teen drivers of passenger vehicles involved in fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2015. An estimated 99,000 teen passenger vehicle drivers were injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes.

 

The Problem: Too many teens are dying on our roads

What should we be communicating about with teens and driving?

Alcohol: Even though it is illegal for teens to possess, purchase and consume alcohol, almost one out of five teen passenger vehicle drivers involved in a fatal crash had been drinking. 

Seat Belts: Wearing a seat belt is one of the simplest ways for a teen driver to stay safe.  Yet in 2015, a total of 531 passengers died in passenger vehicles driven by teens.  58 percent of those passengers were not wearing their seat belts at the time of the fatal crash.  In 84 percent of the cases where the teen driver was unbuckled, the passengers were also unbuckled. 

Distracted Driving: In 2015, among teen drivers involved in fatal crashes, 10 percent were reported as being distracted at the time of the crash. 

Speeding: In 2015, almost one-third or 29 percent of all teen passenger vehicle drivers involved in fatal crashes were speeding at the time of the crash. 

Passengers: Research shows that the risk of a fatal crash goes up in direct relation to the number of passengers in the car.  Multiple passengers who are distracting the driver triples the possibility of a crash.

Drowsy Driving: Teens are busy with school, studying, extracurricular activity, part-time jobs and spending time with friends among many other things.  With all of this, teens tend to compromise by not getting enough sleep.  This is a dangerous habit that can lead to drowsy driving and a crash. 

Keep in mind that those of us that are parents, or who have influence over a teen should be setting a good example as our teens actually listen to us and watch us more than we realize.  We need to be good role models and talk with the teen on safe driving regularly through the year.  Establish the rules and make sure the teen is observing the graduated Driver’s License regulations that are applicable to them. Remind our teens that driving is a privilege and not a right.  That if driving isn’t taken seriously, there may be injury or death caused by a crash and that the risk isn’t worth it. 

Take the time to remind them regarding the consequences of the points listed above.

Check out National Teen Driver Safety Week to learn more about safe driving tips.

 Contact James F. “Harry” Barger for more info.

Published October 6, 2017.

Atrium Cafe weekly lunch menu

The Atrium Café lunch menu for the week of Oct. 2-6.

 

Monday

Baked salmon, red potatoes, vegetable and roll

Tuesday

Chicken parmesan, penne pasta, vegetable and garlic bread

Wednesday

Meatloaf, mashed potatoes, vegetable and roll

Thursday

BBQ chicken, baked beans, coleslaw and roll

Friday

Fried cod, fries, cole slaw and roll

 Lunch specials listed above include a fountain drink or milk.

 

The Atrium Café features a variety of dining options:

  • Hand-crafted, stone hearth pizzas
  • A farm-to-table eatery, serving minimally processed foods
  • International choices, with a rotating menu from around the world
  • A Deli offering made-to-order cold and grilled panini sandwiches
  • Grill station offering breakfast sandwiches, burgers, fries, chicken tenders and other favorites
  • Hot entree station
  • Soup
  • Salad bar

 

Hours

Monday - Thursday: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Friday: 7:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Published September 22, 2017. Updated October 2, 2017.

Atrium Café weekly lunch menu

The Atrium Café lunch menu for the week of Oct. 16-20.

 

Monday

Fried catfish

Red beans and rice

Collard greens

Cornbread

Tuesday

Baked potato bar with assorted toppings

Wednesday

Tuscan chicken

Wild rice pilaf

Vegetable

Roll

Thursday

BBQ beef brisket

Fries

Cole slaw

Texas toast

Friday

Fried Cod

Fries

Cole slaw

Roll

 Lunch specials listed above include a fountain drink or milk.

 

The Atrium Café features a variety of dining options:

  • Hand-crafted, stone hearth pizzas
  • A farm-to-table eatery, serving minimally proccesed foods
  • International choices, with a rotating menu from around the world
  • A Deli offereing made-to-order cold and grilled panini sandwiches
  • Grill station offering breakfast sandwiches,  burgers, fries, chicken tenders and other favorites
  • Hot entree station
  • Soup
  • Salad bar

 

Hours

Monday - Thursday: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Friday: 7:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Published September 13, 2017. Updated October 13, 2017.

Learn students' names with these resources

Most would agree that learning students’ names is an important factor in a student success. Daniel F. Chambliss, Sociology professor at Hamilton College, wrote, “The best thing I do to improve students’ work in my courses is … I will learn and use their names. It’s easy, and it works. Using those names in class is uniquely powerful.”  

While remembering names may seem like a simple and basic task, it sometimes takes time and effort. These resources below offer strategies that may help with learning students’ names.  

For more information on these and other course success strategies, please contact CETL. For more information on the upcoming spring 2018 Focus on Focus implementation of course success interventions, please contact any Focus on Focus team member listed on the SharePoint site.  

Published August 28, 2017.

How does solar eclipse affect energy use?

We all know that the solar eclipse can hurt your eyes, but did you know it can also affect energy consumption?

Even though Madison isn't in the direct path of the eclipse, renewable energy instructor Dr. Ken Walz says energy usuage will still be widely affected. 

"At its maximum, the eclipse will block about 85 percent of the light from the sun. This will occur at around 1:15 p.m. and will last nearly 3 hours. So even at this extreme, solar panels in Madison will still be producing some electricity - just a lot less than they would on a clear sky day."

The U.S. Energy Information Administration also provides a very thourough explaination of how the eclipse will affect solar photovoltaic generators.

 

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Scientific Visualization Studio

Smart thermostats are popular because they give homeowners more control over their heating/cooling needs, which helps save money.

 

Published August 18, 2017. Updated August 21, 2017.

What does our district look like in numbers?

Madison College's district includes 40 other school districts, 12 counties, 224 municipalities and 749,727 residents. 

Within in our district, including all regional campuses, 29 percent of high school students enroll at our college within three years of graduating.

 

Published July 7, 2017. Updated August 30, 2017.

When is the midpoint of summer?

We at Matters seek to answer your burning questions, such as, “When is the midpoint of summer? I just can’t wait to go back.”

A look at the calendar reveals that July 5 is the midpoint between Spring Commencement 2017 on May 12 and the beginning of the fall 2017 term, which is Aug. 28.

Published June 14, 2017. Updated July 10, 2017.

ECE and WIC support breastfeeding in daycare and work facilities

Madison College Early Childhood Education students are working in cooperation with Women, Infants and Children (WIC) to support breastfeeding in child care centers and other workplace locations. WIC has received a grant that is allowing them to assist centers in how to establish a breastfeeding-friendly environment.

Our students have been trained by WIC on what makes a breast feeding friendly environment and to present this information with their practicum sites and workplaces.

Published March 24, 2017. Updated July 7, 2017.

Campus student enrollment facts

The total enrollment headcount for all campuses in the 2015-16 academic year was 37,164 students. Below is a breakdown for each campus.

Madison campuses:

  • Truax — 20,801
  • DTEC — 5,409
  • Commercial Ave — 1,857
  • Madison South — 999
  • Madison West — 3,727 

Regional campuses:

  • Fort Atkinson — 1,329
  • Portage — 1,232
  • Reedsburg — 1,387
  • Watertown — 1,097
  • Other — 1,844
  • Online — 7,886

 

Published January 13, 2017. Updated July 7, 2017.

How long is the Truax building?

The main Truax building measures 1,000 feet from the west face of the Gateway stair to the east face of stair E. 

Just how long is 1,000 feet?

  • 117 feet longer than the Titanic (883').
  • 92 feet shorter than a Nimitz class aircraft carrier (1,092').
  • 14 feet longer than the Eiffel Tower (986'), if the Eiffel Tower was lying sideways.
  • Approximately 75 times longer than a 1964 Volkswagen Beetle (13.33').
  • .00000000000003221738542107 light years.

 

 

Published November 18, 2016.

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